analyze The Canterbury Tales and identify and discuss the relationships between the various storytellers and stories.

analyze The Canterbury Tales and identify and discuss the relationships between the various storytellers and stories.Essay Two:The Canterbury TalesFor your second essay you are going to analyze The Canterbury Tales and identify and discuss the relationships between the various storytellers and stories.  Compare and contrast the societal values / morality being promoted in each prologue and story set.  What are the main values being promoted in each work?  Are the same values being promoted in each or are different values being promoted?  How is the presentation of these values similar and different?  For this essay, discuss at least two sets of stories and prologues.  Choose between the Miller and his tale, the Pardoner and his tale, and the Wife of Bath and her tale.  In evaluating each story, be sure to consider what we know about the person telling the story; for example, in discussing the point Chaucer is making, don’t divorce the Pardoner’s story from the Pardoner, himself.Explanation of the Topic1.    A societal value is a principle or quality that most people in a particular culture agree to be of great importance.  Examples of American societal values today (NOT necessarily held in medieval England) might include individual human rights, democratic election of government leaders and representatives, financial prosperity, higher education, home ownership, and close family relationships.2.    A single word—such as love, religion, government, or money—is usually not specific enough to identify a societal value.  Clearly label and define each value you discuss.3.    A literary work may reveal a societal value either positively (by approving something that is deemed good) or negatively (by disapproving something that is deemed bad).  In the latter case, the societal value is the opposite of whatever is disapproved.  For example, if a work ridicules treason (betrayal of one’s country), then it may be demonstrating the societal value of patriotism (loyalty to one’s country).5.    A work’s references to a particular custom, topic, or theme (such as to seduction in Sir Gawain and “The Miller’s Tale”) do NOT necessarily indicate that this is a societal value.  Clearly explain how the work shows a quality or principle to be a societal value.Formatting Guidelines1.    The essay should be at least three (3) complete pages long and should follow MLA formatting guidelines.  Two and a half pages is not three pages.2.    Use Times New Roman font, size 12.3.    Use margins of one inch.  Microsoft Word defaults to 1.25 inches, so be sure to change this.4.    Spacing: Double-space your paper. Do NOT leave additional spaces before or after the title or between paragraphs.  If you are using Word 2007, change the default settings to remove the extra space after the title and after each paragraph.5.    Justification: Use left (not right or full) justification.6.    Paragraph indentation: Indent each paragraph one-half inch (five [5] spaces) from the left margin.Content Guidelines1.    Work independently. This is not a collaborative project. Do not submit an essay that is like someone else’s in content or organization.  Rely on your own reading of the assigned works.  Do not use sources other than the works themselves.  (If you do, however, use the words or ideas of other written sources, such as the editors’ introductions in the textbook, introduce them in the body of your essay.)2.    You should have an interesting and informative title.a.    The title should clearly and specifically reflect the content of the essay (and especially of the thesis).3.    Provide an introduction that includes a “hook” to get readers interested, a clear thesis, and a blueprint/roadmap of what’s to come in the essay.4.    State your thesis clearly at the end of the first paragraph.a.    A thesis is a specific claim.5.    Provide examples from each story to illustrate and support your claims.a.    Include a minimum of three (3) direct quotes from each work.6.    The focus of the paper should be supporting and explaining your interpretation.  Work to keep summarizing to a minimum.  The summary exists only to support the analysis.  Do not let summarizing dominate your essay.7.    Stay focused on supporting your thesis.  Avoid tangents and overly long quotes or summaries.8.    Don’t get so focused on one work that you neglect the other one.  Remember that this essay is meant to be a discussion of the relationship between the two works.9.    Use appropriate transitions between each section of your essay.10.    Your body paragraphs can be arranged in one of two ways.  First, you may choose to discuss one story, then the other story, and then compare and contrast the two.  Or you may choose to compare and contrast both stories simultaneously (point by point).  Either way, make sure your arrangement strategy is clear.  Also make sure to always make clear which story you’re talking about at any point.  Stay with one arrangement strategy.11.    In each body paragraph, use logically appropriate examples from the assigned works to support the topic sentence of the paragraph and the thesis of the essay.a.    Be sure to spell, capitalize, and punctuate correctly the names of authors (when they are known), characters, and titles of works.b.    Place the titles of short works inside quotation marks.  These will include the individual tales found in The Canterbury Tales.c.    Italicize titles of works long enough to be published separately.d.    When you refer to the plots and characters of the works in your own words, use present tense verbs. When you quote, leave verb tense as it is in the textbook.12.    Begin your paragraphs with a topic sentence, not a quote.13.    Conclusion: Conclude the essay with a one- or two-sentence paragraph that restates the thesis (in different words).  No other conclusion is necessary.  Use your limited space to develop the body of the essay.14.    You can set up your paper fairly mechanically.  I’ll be focused on the clarity of the claims you’re making and your ability to support those claims through reasoned arguments with material from the two works.15.    Editing and Proofreading: Revise, edit, and proofread your essay carefully.  Be sure to use spell-check.16.    Document all of your sources on a Works Cited page.  This page is in addition to the three (3) page minimum for the essay.  It will be the fourth or fifth page (depending on whether your essay is three or four pages long).Documentation and Citation1.    Follow the conventions of written English, including quoting from the text accurately.2.    Properly integrate quotations into your essay according to MLA guidelines.3.    Smoothly introduce all quotations; don’t just begin quoting.a.    Like this:  In “The Wife’s Lament,” the speaker grieves the loss of her relationship with her husband: “Our friendship is as if it had never been” (114).b.    NOT like this: “Our friendship is as if it had never been” (114).4.    Immediately after each brief quotation of prose, document in parenthesis the page number.  Do NOT use page numbers, however, to introduce quotations.a.    Like this: In “The Dream of the Rood,” the cross refers to Christ as “the young Hero” (28).b.    NOT like this: On page 28, the cross in “The Dream of the Rood” refers to Christ as “the young Hero.”5.    Immediately after each brief quotation of poetry (when line numbers are supplied in your textbook), document in parenthesis the page number followed by a semicolon, one space, the word “line” or “lines,” and the line number(s).  Do NOT use page and/or line numbers, however, to introduce quotations.a.    Like this: The narrator of Beowulf says the Danes sometimes worshipped at “pagan shrines” (37; line 175).b.    NOT like this: In Beowulf, line 175, it says the Danes sometimes worshipped at “pagan shrines.”6.    Place periods and commas INSIDE, not outside, closing quotation marks.a.    Like this: In “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale,” Chaucer reveals even more about marriage than in “The Miller’s Tale.”b.    NOT like this: In “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale”, Chaucer reveals even more about marriage than in “The Miller’s Tale”.7.    When parenthetical documentation immediately follows quotation marks, drop the punctuation mark at the end of the quotation (with the exception of a question mark or exclamation point), and after the parenthetical documentation place the punctuation your own sentence requires.a.    Like this: The Wanderer laments, “All delight has gone” (112).b.    NOT like this: The Wanderer laments, “All delight has gone.” (112)c.    Like this: The Wanderer asks, “Where is the giver of treasure?” (113).d.    NOT like this: The Wanderer asks, “Where is the giver of treasure” (113)?8.    Leave one space between closing quotation marks and opening parenthesis.a.    Like this: Nicholas yells, “Water!” (251).b.    NOT like this: Nicholas yells, “Water!”(251).9.    When you quote from poetry, make sure you use slash marks to show where the line of poetry ends, like this: “Wiglaf went quickly, keen to get back, / excited by the treasure” (lines 2783-84).  However, if you’re quoting more than 3 lines of poetry, you should create a block quote, like this:Wiglaf went quickly, keen to get back,excited by the treasure.  Anxiety weighedon his brave heart—he was hoping he would findthe leader of the Geats alive where he had left him.  (lines 2783-86)If you have any questions, please post them in the “Ask Your Instructor” section of the Discussions section of our D2L page.analyze The Canterbury Tales and identify and discuss the relationships between the various storytellers and stories.Essay Two:The Canterbury TalesFor your second essay you are going to analyze The Canterbury Tales and identify and discuss the relationships between the various storytellers and stories.  Compare and contrast the societal values / morality being promoted in each prologue and story set.  What are the main values being promoted in each work?  Are the same values being promoted in each or are different values being promoted?  How is the presentation of these values similar and different?  For this essay, discuss at least two sets of stories and prologues.  Choose between the Miller and his tale, the Pardoner and his tale, and the Wife of Bath and her tale.  In evaluating each story, be sure to consider what we know about the person telling the story; for example, in discussing the point Chaucer is making, don’t divorce the Pardoner’s story from the Pardoner, himself.Explanation of the Topic1.    A societal value is a principle or quality that most people in a particular culture agree to be of great importance.  Examples of American societal values today (NOT necessarily held in medieval England) might include individual human rights, democratic election of government leaders and representatives, financial prosperity, higher education, home ownership, and close family relationships.2.    A single word—such as love, religion, government, or money—is usually not specific enough to identify a societal value.  Clearly label and define each value you discuss.3.    A literary work may reveal a societal value either positively (by approving something that is deemed good) or negatively (by disapproving something that is deemed bad).  In the latter case, the societal value is the opposite of whatever is disapproved.  For example, if a work ridicules treason (betrayal of one’s country), then it may be demonstrating the societal value of patriotism (loyalty to one’s country).5.    A work’s references to a particular custom, topic, or theme (such as to seduction in Sir Gawain and “The Miller’s Tale”) do NOT necessarily indicate that this is a societal value.  Clearly explain how the work shows a quality or principle to be a societal value.Formatting Guidelines1.    The essay should be at least three (3) complete pages long and should follow MLA formatting guidelines.  Two and a half pages is not three pages.2.    Use Times New Roman font, size 12.3.    Use margins of one inch.  Microsoft Word defaults to 1.25 inches, so be sure to change this.4.    Spacing: Double-space your paper. Do NOT leave additional spaces before or after the title or between paragraphs.  If you are using Word 2007, change the default settings to remove the extra space after the title and after each paragraph.5.    Justification: Use left (not right or full) justification.6.    Paragraph indentation: Indent each paragraph one-half inch (five [5] spaces) from the left margin.Content Guidelines1.    Work independently. This is not a collaborative project. Do not submit an essay that is like someone else’s in content or organization.  Rely on your own reading of the assigned works.  Do not use sources other than the works themselves.  (If you do, however, use the words or ideas of other written sources, such as the editors’ introductions in the textbook, introduce them in the body of your essay.)2.    You should have an interesting and informative title.a.    The title should clearly and specifically reflect the content of the essay (and especially of the thesis).3.    Provide an introduction that includes a “hook” to get readers interested, a clear thesis, and a blueprint/roadmap of what’s to come in the essay.4.    State your thesis clearly at the end of the first paragraph.a.    A thesis is a specific claim.5.    Provide examples from each story to illustrate and support your claims.a.    Include a minimum of three (3) direct quotes from each work.6.    The focus of the paper should be supporting and explaining your interpretation.  Work to keep summarizing to a minimum.  The summary exists only to support the analysis.  Do not let summarizing dominate your essay.7.    Stay focused on supporting your thesis.  Avoid tangents and overly long quotes or summaries.8.    Don’t get so focused on one work that you neglect the other one.  Remember that this essay is meant to be a discussion of the relationship between the two works.9.    Use appropriate transitions between each section of your essay.10.    Your body paragraphs can be arranged in one of two ways.  First, you may choose to discuss one story, then the other story, and then compare and contrast the two.  Or you may choose to compare and contrast both stories simultaneously (point by point).  Either way, make sure your arrangement strategy is clear.  Also make sure to always make clear which story you’re talking about at any point.  Stay with one arrangement strategy.11.    In each body paragraph, use logically appropriate examples from the assigned works to support the topic sentence of the paragraph and the thesis of the essay.a.    Be sure to spell, capitalize, and punctuate correctly the names of authors (when they are known), characters, and titles of works.b.    Place the titles of short works inside quotation marks.  These will include the individual tales found in The Canterbury Tales.c.    Italicize titles of works long enough to be published separately.d.    When you refer to the plots and characters of the works in your own words, use present tense verbs. When you quote, leave verb tense as it is in the textbook.12.    Begin your paragraphs with a topic sentence, not a quote.13.    Conclusion: Conclude the essay with a one- or two-sentence paragraph that restates the thesis (in different words).  No other conclusion is necessary.  Use your limited space to develop the body of the essay.14.    You can set up your paper fairly mechanically.  I’ll be focused on the clarity of the claims you’re making and your ability to support those claims through reasoned arguments with material from the two works.15.    Editing and Proofreading: Revise, edit, and proofread your essay carefully.  Be sure to use spell-check.16.    Document all of your sources on a Works Cited page.  This page is in addition to the three (3) page minimum for the essay.  It will be the fourth or fifth page (depending on whether your essay is three or four pages long).Documentation and Citation1.    Follow the conventions of written English, including quoting from the text accurately.2.    Properly integrate quotations into your essay according to MLA guidelines.3.    Smoothly introduce all quotations; don’t just begin quoting.a.    Like this:  In “The Wife’s Lament,” the speaker grieves the loss of her relationship with her husband: “Our friendship is as if it had never been” (114).b.    NOT like this: “Our friendship is as if it had never been” (114).4.    Immediately after each brief quotation of prose, document in parenthesis the page number.  Do NOT use page numbers, however, to introduce quotations.a.    Like this: In “The Dream of the Rood,” the cross refers to Christ as “the young Hero” (28).b.    NOT like this: On page 28, the cross in “The Dream of the Rood” refers to Christ as “the young Hero.”5.    Immediately after each brief quotation of poetry (when line numbers are supplied in your textbook), document in parenthesis the page number followed by a semicolon, one space, the word “line” or “lines,” and the line number(s).  Do NOT use page and/or line numbers, however, to introduce quotations.a.    Like this: The narrator of Beowulf says the Danes sometimes worshipped at “pagan shrines” (37; line 175).b.    NOT like this: In Beowulf, line 175, it says the Danes sometimes worshipped at “pagan shrines.”6.    Place periods and commas INSIDE, not outside, closing quotation marks.a.    Like this: In “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale,” Chaucer reveals even more about marriage than in “The Miller’s Tale.”b.    NOT like this: In “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale”, Chaucer reveals even more about marriage than in “The Miller’s Tale”.7.    When parenthetical documentation immediately follows quotation marks, drop the punctuation mark at the end of the quotation (with the exception of a question mark or exclamation point), and after the parenthetical documentation place the punctuation your own sentence requires.a.    Like this: The Wanderer laments, “All delight has gone” (112).b.    NOT like this: The Wanderer laments, “All delight has gone.” (112)c.    Like this: The Wanderer asks, “Where is the giver of treasure?” (113).d.    NOT like this: The Wanderer asks, “Where is the giver of treasure” (113)?8.    Leave one space between closing quotation marks and opening parenthesis.a.    Like this: Nicholas yells, “Water!” (251).b.    NOT like this: Nicholas yells, “Water!”(251).9.    When you quote from poetry, make sure you use slash marks to show where the line of poetry ends, like this: “Wiglaf went quickly, keen to get back, / excited by the treasure” (lines 2783-84).  However, if you’re quoting more than 3 lines of poetry, you should create a block quote, like this:Wiglaf went quickly, keen to get back,excited by the treasure.  Anxiety weighedon his brave heart—he was hoping he would findthe leader of the Geats alive where he had left him.  (lines 2783-86)If you have any questions, please post them in the “Ask Your Instructor” section of the Discussions section of our D2L page.

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