Explain how all three components would be used to determine the compensation for an employee.

  • Job Description (i.e., work that an employee is expected to perform).
  • Performance Evaluation (i.e., work that the employee has performed).
  • External Salary Survey and Internal Salary Comparison (i.e., pay provided to each employee).

Examine the interrelationship between these three components by describing the purpose of each component and how it affects the others. Then explain how all three components would be used to determine the compensation for an employee. Your examination should include a salary evaluation for a position you are familiar with (Administrative Assistant, Human Resource Manager, Maintenance Worker, etc). The salary evaluation should give results for each of the three components and detail how pay is finally determined for this position based on the three components.

Example of the salary evaluation portion of your analysis:

Purchasing Manager.

Primary functions from the Job Description: To plan, direct, and coordinate the activities of buyers, purchasing officers, and related workers involved in purchasing materials, products and services.

Organizational performance evaluation system:

Outstanding – 6% Increase

  • Exceeds expectations – 4% Increase
  • Meets expectations – 2% Increase
  • Does not meet expectations – No Increase

External Salary Survey: (salary survey, which you can typically obtain online) Monthly salary range at $4,300 – $5,200.

Internal Salary Comparison: (the relationship of this position to similar positions in your organization) Position is similar to Accounting Manager, and should be paid within the same monthly salary range of $4,400 – $4,900.

Submit your analysis in a two- to three-page paper formatted to proper APA 6th Edition specifications. Include a minimum of two scholarly references to support your analysis.

INFORMATION———
Designing, implementing, and managing effective and appropriate pay structure architecture allows an organization to attract and retain key talent and control costs regardless of business strategy. How does one know which structure is right for the organization? The answer to this question is not an easy one but can be answered with a series of questions: What is the mission of the organization? What does the organization expect to accomplish through the pay structure? What are the compensable factors associated with the work being done? What are the internal equity factors? What is the competitive environment (that is what is the competition doing and paying)? What is the organization’s size? What is its structure? How many different jobs (classifications)? What is the nature of the work done? Is a union involved? (I can hear you already: So many questions to answer and so little time to answer them.) But you can see these and many more questions needs to be answered before you can get to work on a structure.

Once one has determined the purpose and the characteristics of the organization, one can begin to craft the structure. There are four basic designs for salary structures: traditional, market-based, broadbands, and step structures with entry points, mid-points, and maximum rates of pay. The most common approach in initially designing a structure is to group similar jobs into “pay grades” (page 279-281 – see 284-285 of the text). This often results in “pay ranges” or “pay bands” (more organizations are clustering pay grades into wide bands commonly called “Broadbanding” – see 284-285 of the text).

Remember, a salary range structure is a group of jobs and salary ranges in an organization. The salary range is the span between the maximum and minimum for a job or job group. There are dozens of models in the text and in other sources. The important issue is that, in my view, should not be an inflexible tool used to limit managerial decision making or creativity. One should consider in advance how the salary structure design will impact the organization through its flexibility, philosophy, control, and ability to adapt to business needs as they emerge.

A well-designed salary structure also creates flexibility for managers. The salary structure allows managers to reward performance, skill development, and critical skills without employees leaving the pay range for their position or the need to promote them just for money’s sake. A poorly designed structure limits managers ability to make decisions, limits promotions from within, creates dissatisfaction among high performing employees, and, as a results, increases turnover and ultimately increases labor costs.

It’s important to note here that nearly 55% of organizations use multiple pay structures as a part of a purposed design to meet organizational objectives.  This phenomenon is often due the employment size of the organization and the length of the scalar chain. It can also be the result of a geographically diverse organization, one with many divisions, or one with a union or even several unions.

What is clear in our study of pay structures and system architecture is that the designers cannot operate without concern for the entire organization, its place in the market, and its response to the flow of business strategy. Typically, the narrower the system’s view of the employee’s ability to move through the system and the greater the limit of managerial discretion, the greater the potential of employee dissatisfaction and job turnover. On the other hand, the more flexible a pay system is in meeting the discretionary actions of managers in meeting employee expectations, the less capable the system is in containing labor costs. Pay system architects then must be able to strike a balance for the organizations they serve so as to meet the business goals while appropriately integrating the organization’s philosophy. No easy job it is.

As you think about the paper due this week (Foundations of a Compensation Strategy), consider the “micro” elements in developing an entire pay strategy. Think of the connections address in the question itself and how you would use those relationships to craft a strategy. Use sources available to you on your job and in the text. Remember that you do not have to create an entire system or strategy; only one job or classification and the elements and relationships.

Week 3 Deliverables:

Week Three Learning Outcomes

This week students will:

• Analyze the pros and cons of a chosen job evaluation method

• Assess critical pay survey problems

• Evaluate the interrelationship of performance factors and compensation

Overview

Assignment Due Date Format Grading Percent
Job Evaluation Methods Day 3 (1st post) Discussion Forum 4

 

Survey Preparation Day 3 (1st post) Discussion Forum 4

Week Three Quiz Day 6 Objective Assessment 6

Foundations of a Compensation Strategy Day 7 Written Assignment 10
Examine the Interrelationship Between the Three Components

Total: 3.00

Distinguished – Provides an expertly crafted examination of the interrelationship between the three components.  Exhibits a complete understanding of the purpose of each component and how it affects the others.

Proficient – Provides an examination of the interrelationship between the three components. Exhibits a sufficient understanding of the purpose of each component and how it affects the others.

Basic – Provides an examination of the interrelationship between the three components. Exhibits a rudimentary understanding of the purpose of each component and how it affects the others.

Below Expectations – Attempts to provide an examination of the interrelationship between the three components, but exhibits a very limited understanding of the purpose of each component and how it affects the others.

Non-Performance – The paper is either nonexistent or fails to discuss the interrelationship between the three components.

Explain How All Three Components Would be Used to Determine the Compensation for an Employee

Total: 3.00

Distinguished – Provides an expertly crafted and completely accurate explanation of how all three components would be used to determine the compensation for an employee.

Proficient – Provides a sufficiently crafted and accurate explanation of how all three components would be used to determine the compensation for an employee. May be missing minor details or contain minor inaccuracies.

Basic – Provides an explanation of how all three components would be used to determine the compensation for an employee. Explanation may contain some inaccuracies or be missing major details.

Below Expectations – Attempts to provide an explanation of how all three components would be used to determine compensation for an employee; however, explanation may contain major inaccuracies or may be lacking in details.

Non-Performance – The paper is either nonexistent or fails to explain how all three components would be used to determine the compensation for an employee.

Salary Evaluation

Total: 2.00

Distinguished – Provides a fully completed salary evaluation. Evaluation shows a complete understanding of the three components.

Proficient – Provides a mostly completed salary evaluation. Evaluation shows a sufficient understanding of the three components.

Basic – Provides a partially completed salary evaluation. Evaluation shows a rudimentary understanding of the three components.

Below Expectations – Provides an underdeveloped salary evaluation. Evaluation shows a lack of understanding of the three components.

Non-Performance – The paper is either nonexistent or fails to provide a salary evaluation.

Creative Thinking: Innovative Thinking

Total: 0.50

Distinguished – Creates new knowledge derived from a novel or unique idea, question, format, or product.

Proficient – Constructs an original idea, question, format, or product.

Basic – Attempts to construct an original or unique idea, question, format, or product.

Below Expectations – Student reinvents available ideas.

Non-Performance – The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions.

Critical Thinking: Explanation of Issues

Total: 0.50

Distinguished – Clearly and comprehensively explains in detail the issue to be considered, delivering all relevant information necessary for full understanding.

Proficient – Clearly explains in detail the issue to be considered, delivering enough relevant information for an adequate understanding.

Basic – Briefly recognizes the issue to be considered, delivering minimal information for a basic understanding.

Below Expectations – Briefly recognizes the issue to be considered, but may not deliver additional information necessary for a basic understanding.

Non-Performance – The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions.

Written Communication: Control of Syntax and Mechanics

Total: 0.25

Distinguished – Displays meticulous comprehension and organization of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling and grammar. Written work contains no errors, and is very easy to understand.

Proficient – Displays comprehension and organization of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling and grammar. Written work contains only a few minor errors, and is mostly easy to understand.

Basic – Displays basic comprehension of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling and grammar. Written work contains a few errors, which may slightly distract the reader.

Below Expectations – Fails to display basic comprehension of syntax or mechanics, such as spelling and grammar. Written work contains major errors, which distract the reader.

Non-Performance – The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions.

APA Formatting

Total: 0.25

Distinguished – Accurately uses APA formatting consistently throughout the paper, title page, and reference page.

Proficient – Exhibits APA formatting throughout the paper. However, layout contains a few minor errors.

Basic – Exhibits basic knowledge of APA formatting throughout the paper. However, layout does not meet all APA requirements.

Below Expectations – Fails to exhibit basic knowledge of APA formatting. There are frequent errors, making the layout difficult to distinguish as APA.

Non-Performance – The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions.

Page Requirement

Total: 0.25

Distinguished – The paper meets the specific page requirement stipulated in the assignment description.

Proficient – The paper closely meets the page requirement stipulated in the assignment description.

Basic – The paper meets over half of the page requirement stipulated in the assignment description.

Below Expectations – A fraction of the page requirement is completed.

Non-Performance – The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions.

Source Requirement

Total: 0.25

Distinguished – Uses more than the required number of scholarly sources, providing compelling evidence to support ideas. All sources on the reference page are used and cited correctly within the body of the assignment.

Proficient – Uses required number of scholarly sources to support ideas. All sources on the reference page are used and cited correctly within the body of the assignment.

Basic – Uses less than the required number of sources to support ideas. Some sources may not be scholarly. Most sources on the reference page are used within the body of the assignment. Citations may not be formatted correctly.

Below Expectations – Uses inadequate number of sources that provide little or no support for ideas. Sources used may not be scholarly. Most sources on the reference page are not used within the body of the assignment. Citations are not formatted correctly.

Non-Performance – The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions.

Powered by

Teddi Reilly 8/13/2015 12:00 AM

Avoiding Plagiarism

Please take note that in this class Originality matters and plagiarism will be reported.

Address any questions regarding plagiarism to the course instructor. Students should be aware that Ashford University instructors utilize Turnitin to determine the originality of submitted written work. These tools compare students’ work with texts available in internal databases and through Internet searches.

Check out  Turnitin Instructions and FAQs for more information on Turnitin and how you can use it to avoid plagiarism in your own paper.

Here are some general rules to follow:

  1. When in doubt, cite your sources
  2. Refer to the following resources in the AWC when you write your paper: Guidelines for Quoting a SourceGuidelines for Summarizing a Source, and Guidelines for Paraphrasing a Source.
  3. MAKE TIME for your paper. Last–minute work makes plagiarism too tempting.
  4. TAKE NOTES as you read and note the sources. This will make the final construction of your paper that much easier.
  5. Do not be afraid to take risks in your work, for fear and lack of self–confidence often leads to students taking the “easy road” of resorting to plagiarism. As Nietzsche said, “think dangerously” (but support your arguments).
  6. Most instructors deliberately choose narrow/highly-specified topics and phrase questions in such a way as to(hopefully) avoid fostering plagiaristic tendencies—but work to narrow or define your topic in such a way that plagiarism becomes difficult.
    1. Quote the Good Stuff. Beware of using quotations that do not mean anything or add substance to your essay.

      If a source says something so well that you couldn’t possibly change it, use it!

      If a source backs up a point you made, use it!

      If you understand what a source is saying, use it! You will have to analyze it later, so understanding it will help you.

    2. Avoid Over-quoting. Remember “less is more.” Do not pad your essay with other people’s ideas.
    3. Keep Quotations Short. Keep your quotations 1–2 sentences long or use a few key words/phrases. If you need it all, turn the quotation into a “block quotation,” but use them sparingly! “Block” the quotation if it’s more than 40 words long. Block the quotation by having it start on a new line and in the same position as a new paragraph.

      Example (Note: Block quotations should not be double–spaced):

      In the chapter “Chicken Man,” McBride (1997) narrated his rebellion as a teenager with honesty but without remorse:

      I was obviously hiding, and angry as well, but I would never admit that to myself. The marvelous orchestrated chaos that Mommy had so painstakingly constructed to make her house run smoothly broke down when Daddy died, and Mommy was in no fixing mood. (p. 140)

    4. Copy Quotations Correctly. Misspellings and use of incorrect grammar when it’s obvious that the source couldn’t have made those mistakes affects your own credibility as a writer. Accuracy indicates care for one’s work.

      Use brackets when you alter a word or phrase from the quotation. Example: Picciano (2001) stated, “[Distance learning] technologies [have] certain benefits and certain limitations and, as indicated earlier, a best technology does not yet exist” (p. 61).

      Use an ellipsis when you omit words or phrases from the quotation. Use an ellipsis with brackets […] when you omit an entire sentence. Example: When Fuller (2005) returns home, she explained, “…I was dislocated and depressed” (p. 72).

    5. Do Not Start a Paragraph with a Quotation. A paragraph should begin with your ideas. The first sentence of a paragraph is known as the topic sentence or assertion, both of which support the focus of the essay. In turn, the quotation supports the topic sentence.
    6. Do Not End a Paragraph with a Quotation. Always conclude the paragraph with your ideas. The last sentence should be part of your analysis of the quotation.

      Integrating Quotes into your Essay

      Integrating the words or ideas from another source is a big part of academic writing. Students must be careful not only to avoid plagiarism, but also to enable readers to fully understand your use of a quote or a paraphrase from a source.

      Never insert a quote or a paraphrase abruptly into your writing without first introducing the quote (or paraphrase), citing it, and explaining it This means that you will never begin or end a paragraph with a quote. This method is often referred to as the ICE method of integrating quotes: Introduce, Cite, and then Explain.

      1. Introduce. When introducing your quote, you will provide the context of this quote as well as show the source of the quote. The quote cannot do the work for you; you must provide your reader with some idea of why you have chosen to use this quote. You should also tell your reader who is speaking or where this quote came from and the relationship this person or source has to the point you are making. That is, why should your reader take this quote seriously? Is the speaker or the source an authority on the topic?

        Here is an example:

        In the beginning stages of the juvenile justice system, it operated in accordance to a paternalistic philosophy.   This can be understood through the published words of Judge Julian Mack, who had a hand in the establishment of the juvenile justice system. In 1909, he stated…

        This provides the reader with some context, or the points that you are making by including this quote.

        This part provides the reader with who this quote is coming from as well as his relationship or authority on the topic.

        After including the source of the quote, be sure that you use a signal verb to indicate that the source’s words are next. In the example above, you can see that “he stated” has been used to signal the source’s words. Other signal verbs include:

        adds remarks exclaims announces replies claims
        comments responds estimates writes points out predicts
        argues suggests proposes declares criticizes proclaims
        notes complains observes thinks presents concludes

        For other options, see our list of signal verbs.

        Templates for introducing quotations:X states, “….”

        As the prominent philosophy X puts it, “….”

        According to X, “….”

        X himself writes, “….”

        In her book,…., X maintains that “….”

        In the article,….., X claims that “….”

        In X’s view, “….”

        X agrees when she writes, “….”

        X disagrees when he writes, “….”

        X complicates matters further when she writes, “….”

      2. Cite. Directly after your quote, you will need to provide the in-text citation. For APA format, this includes the author’s last name only, the year of the publication, and the page number (or paragraph number if there is no page number listed).
        Here is an example:

        In 1909, he stated that this system should treat juveniles “as a wise and merciful father handles his own child” (as quoted in Scott and Steinberg, 2008, p. 16).

      3. Explain. After the quote, you will need to explain the significance of the quote. How might it relate to your thesis? Your reader should not have to interpret the quote and what it means or how it helps to support the point you are trying to make. Never leave any room for interpretation. It is your responsibility as the writer to interpret the quote for your reader and provide the significance.

        Using the same quote as above, here is an example of the ICE method: Judge Mack viewed juveniles as children first. He envisioned a system that would protect and give treatment to these young offenders so that they could become productive adults, and saw no place for criminal responsibility and punishment within this system.

        Now, if we look at each step together, this is what we see:

        In the beginning stages of the juvenile justice system, it operated in accordance to a paternalistic philosophy. This can be understood through the published words of Judge Julian Mack, who had a hand in the establishment of the juvenile justice system. In 1909, he stated that this system should treat juveniles “as a wise and merciful father handles his own child” (Scott and Steinberg, 2008, p.16). Judge Mack viewed juveniles as children first. He envisioned a system that would protect and give treatment to these young offenders so that they could become productive adults, and saw no place for criminal responsibility and punishment within this system.

        Context

        Whose words these are and why he is an authority on this topic.

        Quoted material along with citation.

        This part provides the reader with who this quote is coming from as well as his relationship or authority on the topic.

      Top 6 Rules of Thumb

      As you construct your work, remember that instructors never fail to check for plagiarism when they read something suspicious.

Place a similar order with us or any form of academic custom essays related subject and it will be delivered within its deadline. All assignments are written from scratch based on the instructions which you will provide to ensure it is original and not plagiarized. Kindly use the calculator below to get your order cost; Do not hesitate to contact our support staff if you need any clarifications.

Whatever level of paper you need – college, university, research paper, term paper or just a high school paper, you can safely place an order.

Page Navigation